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About STRC

Name of the Organisation : Sosva Training and Promotion Institute

Short Name of the Organisation (If any) : STAPI

Address of the Organisation : Sosva Training And Promotion Institute (STAPI)

MHADA Commercial Complex, First Floor,

Maharashtra Housing Board Colony

Yerawada

Pune 411006

Name of Head of the organization : Parinita Kanitkar

Contact no. of Organization : Tel: 020 - 26687900; 26696212; 26682714 ;

Fax: 020 - 26695646

(Please give mobile no. and landline no.) M No.94 22 00 7470/ Tel: 020 - 26685526

Email Address : stapipune@gmail.com

Website : www.stapi.org.in

Registration Details under Society/Trust /Company :-

Registered Under :

1. Society Registration Act of 1860 Reg. No. 962/ 2000/ G.B.B.S.D. Dated 20/9/2000.

  1. Bombay Public Trust Act of 1950 Reg. No. F-22292 Dated 30/11/2000.

3. 80G ExemptionDetails: Under Section 80 G : PN/CIT-III/Tech/80g/424 /2011-2012 /2794 Dated . 17/2/2012 - until withdrawn From 1/4/2013 to until withdrawn

  1. 12A Registration Certificate Details : Section 12 A- Rg/ TR.4/2001-02/130 Dated 22/3/2002

FCRA Certificate Number : FCRA Registration No. 83930479 Dated

22/3/2007

*(along with no. please mention the start and end date of validity period)

Brief about the organization (Vision/ Mission/ Goal/Activity) :

STAPI is a support service organization focusing on building the capacities of the voluntary organizations working in the diverse field of social sectors to enable them to play a more sustainable and effective role in all sectors of socio-economic development in the service of the community particularly the under-privileged. This includes capacity building, NGO promotion and strengthening for their qualitative sustainable contribution for the betterment of society.

Vision

A Centre of Excellence for Development of Human Resources of Voluntary Sector with core emphasis on values of service, Volunteerism and Professionalism.

Mission

A sustained promotion, strengthening and building up of Human Resources of Voluntary Sector through Training, Consultancy Documentation and Research.

Sr. No

Sectors of Operation

Sr. No

Sectors of Operation

1

Rural Development

6

Social Welfare

2

Women and Child Development

7

Youth Welfare

3

Micro Finance

8

Health and Family Welfare

4

Panchayati Raj

9

Prevention of HIV/AIDS

5

Vocational Skills building

10

Integrated Water Management Programme

Sectors of Operations :-

The Governing Council of STAPI are the people of vision, dedication and experience recipients of several national and international awards like Padmabhushan, Magasaysay and Mother Teresa Awards in recognition of their long years of selfless service in community welfare and public health. Their presence on our Governing Council vouches for our integrity and commitment to the voluntary sector. Late.Mr. V. Srinivasan, IAS (Retd.) and Late. Dr. R. S. Arole are the Founder Members of STAPI.

Major Areas of Operations :-

✓ Capacity building of Grass root community based organizations for human resource development

✓ Capacity Building , Strengthening of People's Collectives and Networking,

✓ Conduct of TNA's, Baseline/Midline/End line Survey ;Revalidation of Data; Project Mapping , Pre Project Planning, project Formulation , Project Management , Project Implementation, Project Monitoring and Evaluation and Project Impact Assessment

✓ Providing implementation assistance, handholding support and Supportive supervision including providing technical assistance to the NGOs/CBOs

✓ Conduct of operational research

✓ Publications for the NGOs /CBO's

Abbreviations

1.

AIDS

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

2.

AAP

Annual Action Plan

3.

AIILSG

All India Institute of Local Self Government

4.

ANC

Anti natal Care

5.

ART

Anti Retroviral Therapy

6.

DACS

District AIDS Control Society

7.

DRP

District Resource Person

8.

FGD

Focused Group Discussion

9.

GDP

Gross Domestic Product

10.

HIV

Human Immunodeficiency Virus

11.

IDU

Intravenous Drug Users

12.

LQAS

Lot Quality Assurance Sampling

13.

M&E

Monitoring and Evaluation

14.

MSM

Men having Sex with Men

15.

NACO

National Aids Control Organization

16.

NACP

National AIDS Control Programme

17.

NGO

Non Governmental Organization

18.

ORW

Outreach Worker

19.

PD

Project Director

20.

PE

Peer Educators

21.

PLHAs

People Living with HIV/AIDS

22.

PM

Project Manager

23.

RTI

Regional Training Institute

24.

SACS

State AIDS Control Society

25.

STAPI

SOSVA Training and Promotion Institute

26.

STI

Sexually Transmitted Infection

27.

STRC

State Training Resource Centre

28.

TCIF

Transport Corporation of India Limited

29.

TI

Targeted Intervention

30.

TNA

Training Needs Assessment

31.

TSU

Technical Support Unit

3.National AIDS Control Programme IV

Background

Govt. of India constituted a taskforce in 1985 to study the problem of HIV/AIDS as related to India. NACP-I programme started in 1994-99 with aim to Initial interventions in HIV - AIDS sector . This was first phase implemented by Govt. of India. The second programme started in 1999-2006 with the aim ofDecentralisation to states , Limited coverage of services. The third Phase-III (2007-2012) was based on the experiences and lessons drawn from NACP-I and II, and was built upon their strengths. Its priorities and thrust areas are drawn up. District FocusMassive scale up with quality assurance mechanisms, 50% reduction in new infections achieved were the aims of NACP III.

Evolution ofNational AIDS Control Programme is as below :-

Sr. No.

NACP Phases

Period

Goals& Objectives :

1

NACP I

1994-1999

Initial interventions

2

NACP II

1999-2006

Decentralisation to states, Limited coverage of services.

3

NACP III

2007-2012

Priorities and thrust areas are drawn up. District Focus Massive scale up with quality assurance mechanisms, 50% reduction in new infections achieved.

4

NACP IV

2012-17

1. Reduce new infections by 50% (2007 Baseline of NACP III)

2. Comprehensive care, support and treatment to all persons living with HIV/AIDS

NACP - IV Components

Component 1: Intensifying and Consolidating Prevention services with a focus on HRG and vulnerable populations. This component will support the scaling up of TIs with the aim of reaching out to the hard to reach population groups who do not yet access and use the prevention services of the program, and saturate coverage among the HRGs. In addition, this component will support the bridge population, i.e. migrants and truckers. Component 1 includes the following two subcomponents:

1.1 Scaling up coverage of TIs among HRG

The interventions under this sub-component will include: (i) the provision of behavior change interventions to increase safe practices, testing and counseling, and adherence to treatment, and demand for other services;(ii) the promotion and provision of condoms to HRG to promote their use in each sexual encounter; (iii) provision or referral for STI services including counseling at service provision centers to increase compliance of patients with treatment, risk reduction counseling with focus on partner referral and management; (iv) needle and syringe exchange for IDUs as well as scaling up of Opioid Substitution Therapy (OST) provision. This sub-component also includes the financing of operating costs for about 25 State Training Resource Centers as well as participant training costs over a period of 5 years.

1.2 Scaling up of interventions among other vulnerable populations

The activities under this subcomponent includes : (i) risk assessment and size estimation of migrant population groups and truckers at transit points and at workplaces; (ii) behavior change communications (BCC) for creating awareness about risk and vulnerability, prevention methods, availability and location of services, increase safe behavior and demand for services as well as reduce stigma;(iii) promotion and provisioning of condoms through different channels including social marketing; (iv) development of linkages with local institutions, both public and NGO owned, for testing, counseling and STI treatment services;(v) creation of "peer support groups" and "safe spaces" for migrants at destination; (vi) establishment of need-based and gender-sensitive services for partners of IDUs; and(vii) strengthening networks of vulnerable populations with enhanced linkages to service centers and risk reduction interventions, specifically condom use.

Component 2: Expanding IEC services for (a) general population and (b) high risk groups with a focus on behavior change and demand generation. IEC has been an important component of the NACP. With the expansion of services for counseling and testing, ART, STI treatment and condom promotion, the demand generation campaigns will continue to be the focus of the NACP-IV communication strategy. IEC will remain an important component of all prevention efforts and will include:Behavior change communication strategies for HRGs, vulnerable groups and hard to reach populations and Increasing awareness among general population, particularly women and youth.

Component 3: Comprehensive Care, Support and Treatment. NACP IV will implement comprehensive HIV care for all those who are in need of such services and facilitate additional support systems for women and children affected and infected with HIV / AIDS. It is envisaged that greater adherence and compliance would be possible with wide network of treatment facilities and collaborative support from PLHIV and civil society groups. Additional Centers of Excellence (CoEs) and upgraded ART Plus centers will be established to provide high-quality treatment and follow-up services, positive prevention and better linkages with health care providers in the periphery.

With increasing maturity of the epidemic, it is very likely that there will be greater demand for 2nd line ART, OI management. NACP IV will address these needs adequately. It is proposed that the comprehensive care, support and treatment of HIV/AIDS will inter alia include: (i) anti-retroviral treatment (ART) including second line (ii) management of opportunistic infections and (iii) facilitating social protection through linkages with concerned Departments/Ministries. The program will explore avenues of public-private partnerships. The program will enhance activities to reduce stigma and discrimination at all levels particularly at health care settings.

Component 4: Strengthening institutional capacities. The objective of NACP IV will be to consolidate the trend of reversal of the epidemic seen at the national level to all the key districts in India. Programme planning and management responsibilities will be strengthened at state and district levels to ensure high quality, timely and effective implementation of field level activities and desired programmatic outcomes.

The planning processes and systems will be further strengthened to ensure that the annual action plans are based on evidence, local priorities and in alignment with NACP IV objectives. Sustaining the epidemic response through increased collaboration and convergence, where feasible, with other departments will be given a high priority during NACP IV. This will involve phased integration of the HIV services with the routine public sector health delivery systems, streamlining the supply chain mechanisms and quality control mechanisms and building capacities of governmental and non-governmental institutions and networks.

Component 5: Strategic Information Management Systems (SIMS). The roll-out of SIMS is ongoing and will be firmly established at all levels to support evidence based planning, program monitoring and measuring of programmatic impacts. The surveillance system will be further strengthened with focus on tracking the epidemic, incidence analysis, identifying pockets of infection and estimating the burden of infection. Research priorities will also be customized to the emerging needs of the program. NACP IV will also document, manage and disseminate evidence and effective utilization of programmatic and research data. The relevant, measurable and verifiable indicators will be identified and used appropriately.

Guiding Principle NACP-III : The goal, objectives and strategies of NACP-III are reflected by the following guiding principles:

· The unifying credo of Three Ones, i.e., one Agreed Action Framework, one National HIV/AIDS Coordinating Authority and one Agreed National Monitoring and Evaluation System.

· Equity is to be monitored by relevant indicators in both prevention and impact mitigation strategies i.e. percentage of people accessing services disaggregated by age and gender.

· Respect for the rights of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA), as it contributes most positively to prevention and control efforts. NACP-III has evolved mechanisms to address human rights and ethics issues concerning HIV/AIDS. Particular focus is on the fundamental rights of PLHA and their active involvement as important partners in prevention, care, support and treatment initiatives.

· Civil society representation and participation in the planning and implementation of NACP-III is essential for promoting social ownership and community involvement.

· Creation of an enabling environment wherein those infected and affected by HIV can lead a life of dignity. This is the cornerstone of all interventions.

· Provide universal access to HIV prevention, care, support and treatment services.

· For making the implementation mechanism more responsive, proactive and dynamic, the HRD strategy of NACO and SACS is based on qualification, competence, commitment and continuity.

Strategic and programme interventions are to be evidence-based and result oriented with scope for innovations and flexibility. Priority is accorded to specific local contexts.

Programme Priorities and Thrust Areas : NACP-III is based on the experiences and lessons drawn from NACP-I and II, and is built upon their strengths. Its priorities and thrust areas are drawn up accordingly and include the following:

· Considering that more than 99 percent of the population in the country is free from infection, NACP-III places the highest priority on preventive efforts while, at the same time, seeks to integrate prevention with care, support and treatment.

· Sub-populations that have the highest risk of exposure to HIV will receive the highest priority in the intervention programmes. These would include sex workers, men-who-have-sex-with-men and injecting drug users. Second high priority in the intervention programmes is accorded to long-distance truckers, prisoners, migrants (including refugees) and street children.

· In the general population those who have the greater need for accessing prevention services, such as treatment of STIs, voluntary counselling and testing and condoms, will be next in the line of priority.

· NACP-III ensures that all persons who need treatment would have access to prophylaxis and management of opportunistic infections. People who need access to ART will also be assured first line ARV drugs.

· Prevention needs of children are addressed through universal provision of PPTCT services. Children who are infected are assured access to paediatric ART.

· NACP-III is committed to address the needs of persons infected and affected by HIV, especially children. This will be done through the sectors and agencies involved in child protection and welfare. In mitigating the impact of HIV, support is also drawn from welfare agencies providing nutritional support, opportunities for income generation and other welfare services.

· NACP-III also plans to invest in community care centres to provide psycho-social support, outreach services, referrals and palliative care.

· Socio-economic determinants that make a person vulnerable also increase the risk of exposure to HIV. NACP-III will work with other agencies involved in vulnerability reduction such as women's groups, youth groups, trade unions etc. to integrate HIV prevention into their activities.

Mainstreaming and partnerships are the key approaches to facilitate multi-sectoral response engaging a wide range of stakeholders. Private sector, civil society organisations, networks of people living with HIV/AIDS and government departments all have a crucial role in prevention, care, support, treatment and service delivery. Technical and financial resources of the development partners are leveraged to achieve the objectives of the programme.

Prevention Strategies: Prevention is the mainstay of the strategic response to HIV/AIDS in India as 99 percent population of the country is uninfected. The HIV prevalence pattern in the remaining one percent population largely determines the prevention and control strategy for the epidemic in the country.

NACP - IV Targets : Year wise details of targets and component wise expenditure for NACP IV

Program Components

Prevention

A

Targeted Interventions among High Risk Groups and Bridge Populations

1

Number of FSW covered

2

Number of MSM covered

3

Number of IDU covered

4

Number of Truckers covered

5

Number of High Risk Migrants covered

6

Number of TIs

B

Link Worker

1

Number of HRGs covered

C

Integrated Counseling and Testing

1

Number of vulnerable population accessing ICTC services /annum

2

Number of pregnant mothers tested under PPTCT/annum

3

Number of PPTCT/ICTC centers

4

No. of HIV +ve mother and child pair receiving Prophylaxis

D

Sexually Transmitted Infections

1

No. of adults with STI symptoms accessing syndromic management/ annum

2

Number of designated STI /RTI clinics

E

Blood Transfusion Services

1

No. of Blood Banks supported under NACP

2

No. of units of blood collected in DAC supported Blood Banks/annum

3

Percentage of Voluntary blood donation in DAC supported Blood Banks

F

Condom Promotion

1

No. of condoms distributed (Free + Social + Commercial)

G

Comprehensive Care, Support and Treatment

1

Number of ART Centers

2

Number of PLHIV provided free ART (includes First line, Second line & Children)

Guiding PrincipleNACP-III : The goal, objectives and strategies of NACP-III are reflected by the following guiding principles:

· The unifying credo of Three Ones, i.e., one Agreed Action Framework, one National HIV/AIDS Coordinating Authority and one Agreed National Monitoring and Evaluation System.

· Equity is to be monitored by relevant indicators in both prevention and impact mitigation strategies i.e. percentage of people accessing services disaggregated by age and gender.

· Respect for the rights of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA), as it contributes most positively to prevention and control efforts. NACP-III has evolved mechanisms to address human rights and ethics issues concerning HIV/AIDS. Particular focus is on the fundamental rights of PLHA and their active involvement as important partners in prevention, care, support and treatment initiatives.

· Civil society representation and participation in the planning and implementation of NACP-III is essential for promoting social ownership and community involvement.

· Creation of an enabling environment wherein those infected and affected by HIV can lead a life of dignity. This is the cornerstone of all interventions.

· Provide universal access to HIV prevention, care, support and treatment services.

· For making the implementation mechanism more responsive, proactive and dynamic, the HRD strategy of NACO and SACS is based on qualification, competence, commitment and continuity.

Strategic and programme interventions are to be evidence-based and result oriented with scope for innovations and flexibility. Priority is accorded to specific local contexts.

Programme Priorities and Thrust Areas :

NACP-III is based on the experiences and lessons drawn from NACP-I and II, and is built upon their strengths. Its priorities and thrust areas are drawn up accordingly and include the following:

· Considering that more than 99 percent of the population in the country is free from infection, NACP-III places the highest priority on preventive efforts while, at the same time, seeks to integrate prevention with care, support and treatment.

· Sub-populations that have the highest risk of exposure to HIV will receive the highest priority in the intervention programmes. These would include sex workers, men-who-have-sex-with-men and injecting drug users. Second high priority in the intervention programmes is accorded to long-distance truckers, prisoners, migrants (including refugees) and street children.

· In the general population those who have the greater need for accessing prevention services, such as treatment of STIs, voluntary counselling and testing and condoms, will be next in the line of priority.

· NACP-III ensures that all persons who need treatment would have access to prophylaxis and management of opportunistic infections. People who need access to ART will also be assured first line ARV drugs.

· Prevention needs of children are addressed through universal provision of PPTCT services. Children who are infected are assured access to paediatric ART.

· NACP-III is committed to address the needs of persons infected and affected by HIV, especially children. This will be done through the sectors and agencies involved in child protection and welfare. In mitigating the impact of HIV, support is also drawn from welfare agencies providing nutritional support, opportunities for income generation and other welfare services.

· NACP-III also plans to invest in community care centres to provide psycho-social support, outreach services, referrals and palliative care.

· Socio-economic determinants that make a person vulnerable also increase the risk of exposure to HIV. NACP-III will work with other agencies involved in vulnerability reduction such as women's groups, youth groups, trade unions etc. to integrate HIV prevention into their activities.

Mainstreaming and partnerships are the key approaches to facilitate multi-sectoral response engaging a wide range of stakeholders. Private sector, civil society organisations, networks of people living with HIV/AIDS and government departments all have a crucial role in prevention, care, support, treatment and service delivery. Technical and financial resources of the development partners are leveraged to achieve the objectives of the programme.

Prevention Strategies: Prevention is the mainstay of the strategic response to HIV/AIDS in India as 99 percent population of the country is uninfected. The HIV prevalence pattern in the remaining one percent population largely determines the prevention and control strategy for the epidemic in the country.

Who is at risk?

The HIV prevalence trend in the country shows disproportionately higher incidence of the infection among certain population groups. An analysis of Annual Sentinel Surveillance data (2003-2005) shows that female sex workers (FSWs), men-who- have-sex-with-men (MSM) and injecting drug users (IDUs) have disproportionately higher incidence of HIV infection. Whereas HIV prevalence in the general population is 0.88 percent, its prevalence among FSWs is 8.44%, IDUs 10.16%, MSM 8.74% and among the attendees of STD clinics it is 5.66 % (see the table below). To gain control over HIV/AIDS spread in the country therefore effective interventions are needed for HRGs.

86 percent Transmission through Sexual Route: Evidence also suggests that India's HIV/AIDS epidemic is largely due to unsafe sex worker-client interactions. About 86 percent HIV incidence in the country is from unprotected sex. Prenatal transmission of the infection is 2.72 percent, whereas 2.57 percent HIV infection is due to transfusion of infected blood or blood products. Though HIV transmission through injecting needles is only 1.97 percent of overall prevalence, it is the major route of the infection transmission in the north-east region.

Epidemic in General Population: Through MSM and sex worker-client interactions the infection spreads to general population. As a majority of men with MSM behaviour are married and a majority of sex worker clients are migrant labours and truck drivers, they pose the risk of infecting their spouses and unborn children.

Targeted Interventions for Prevention, Care and Treatment: For the overall reduction in the epidemic, targeted interventions (TIs) are aimed to effect behaviour change through awareness rising among the high risk groups and clients of sex workers or bridge populations. These interventions are aimed to saturate three high risk groups with information on prevention; address clients of sex workers with safe sex interventions, and build awareness among the spouses of truckers and migrant workers, women aged 15 to 49 and children affected by HIV or vulnerable population groups.

Apart from prevention of HIV infection, TIs facilitate prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases as they increase the risk of HIV infection, and are linked to care, support and treatment services for HIV infected.

Services for Prevention: The HIV epidemic in India is concentrated among high risk groups (sex workers, men-having-sex-with-men, injecting drug users and clients of sex workers), though there is evidence of the infection spreading to the general population. About one-third of districts in the country have high HIV prevalence.

To contain the infection, NACP-III consolidates efforts in prevention, care, support and treatment of HIV/AIDS. Under the plan all HIV/AIDS linked services are integrated and scaled up to sub-district and community level. However, the services available in any area are based on the prevalence there. This is made necessary as HIV/AIDS in India presents heterogeneous epidemiology with high rate of prevalence, more than one percent in general population in some districts and low prevalence in others.

Core Services at District level: In packaging of services, care is taken for the special needs of the region and availability of complementary healthcare system. In high prevalence districts, the full spectrum of preventive, supportive and curative services are available in medical colleges or district hospitals. These hospitals provide HIV/AIDS prevention services including treatment and cure for sexually transmitted infections, psycho-social counselling and support for people infected or affected by HIV, management of opportunistic infections and anti-retroviral therapy for people living with HIV/AIDS, counselling and testing facility for prevention of parent to child transmission of HIV infection, specialised paediatric HIV care and treatment as well as referral for specialist needs such as surgery, ENT and ophthalmology etc.

CHCs give Basic Services: Community Health Centres and Primary Health Centres are integrated in the programme and facilitate prevention through promotion of condoms, counselling and testing for HIV (ICT Centres), prevention of parent to child transmission (PPTCT), treatment and cure for sexually transmitted diseases and management of opportunistic infections.

CBOs for better Service Outreach: Hospitals providing HIV services are linked to NGOs/CBOs which play a significant role in providing peer support services and home-based care for people living with HIV/AIDS. CBOs also facilitate follow-up with children born to HIV positive women, support at the community level and outreach to services at the district level.

Care and Support : The care, support and treatment needs of HIV positive people vary with the stage of the infection. The HIV infected person remains asymptomatic for the initial few years; it manifests by six to eight years. As immunity falls over time the person becomes susceptible to various opportunistic infections (OIs). At this stage, medical treatment and psycho-social support is needed. Access to prompt diagnosis and treatment of OIs ensures that PLHAs live longer and have a better quality of life.

Under NACP-II, focus was given on low-cost care, support and treatment of common OIs. Apart from further improving the availability, accessibility and affordability of ART treatment to the poor, NACP-III plans to strengthen family and community care through psycho-social support to the individuals, more particularly to the marginalised women and children affected by the epidemic, improve compliance of the prescribed ART regimen, and address stigma and discrimination associated with the epidemic.

To achieve this objective, 350 Community Care Centres are planned to be set up during the programme period (2007- 2012) in partnership with PLHA in high prevalence and moderate prevalence districts. These centres will be established based on the epidemiological profile and PLHA load of the districts, and linked to the nearest ART centre. The centres will provide counselling for drug adherence, nutritional needs, treatment support, referral and outreach for follow up, social support and legal services. State AIDS Prevention and Control Societies will ensure access of high risk groups to community care centres through linkages between TIs and the centres.

By strengthening local responses, NACP-III seeks high levels of drug adherence (>95 percent) and compliance of the prescribed ART regimen. This approach to care, support and treatment also creates awareness about the prevention of HIV infection and, thus, is a very significant part of NACP-III in achieving NACO's mission of containing and reversing HIV/AIDS incidence in India.

Care and Support for Children: Approximately 50,000 children below 15 years are infected by HIV every year. So far, care and support response to these children was at a very minimal level. NACP-III plans to improve this through early diagnosis and treatment of HIV exposed children; comprehensive guidelines on paediatric HIV care for each level of the health system; special training to counsellors for counselling HIV positive children; linkages with social sector programmes for accessing social support for infected children; outreach and transportation subsidy to facilitate ART and follow up, nutritional, educational, recreational and skill development support, and by establishing and enforcing minimum standards of care and protection in institutional, foster care and community-based care systems.

Treatment : HIV infection is not the end of life. People can lead a healthy life for a long time with appropriate medical care. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) effectively suppresses replication, if taken at the right time. Successful viral suppression restores the immune system and halts onset and progression of disease as well as reduces chances of getting opportunistic infections - this is how ART is aimed to work. Medication thus enhances both quality of life and longevity.

Adherence to ART is Critical: Adherence to ART regimen is therefore very vital in this treatment. Any irregularity in following the prescribed regimen can lead to resistance to HIV drugs, and therefore can weaken or negate its effect.

ART is Accessible to All : ART is now available free to all those who need it. Public health facilities are mandated to ensure that ART is provided to people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA). Special emphasis is given to the treatment of sero-positive women and infected children.

When is ART Given?

ART is initiated depending upon the stage of infection. PLHA with less than 200 CD4 (while blood cells/ mm3) require treatment irrespective of the clinical stage. For PLHA with 200-350 CD4, ART is offered to symptomatic patients. Among those with CD4 of more than 350, treatment is deferred for asymptomatic persons.

Where is this ART Centres Located?

In order to make treatment more accessible ART centres are located in medical colleges, district hospitals and non-profit charitable institutions providing care, support and treatment services to PLHA. A PLHA network person at each of the ART centre facilitates access to care and treatment services at these centres. ART centres also provide counselling and follow up on treatment adherence and support through community care centres.

Paediatric Care and Support: The primary goal of paediatric prevention, care and treatment programme is to prevent HIV infection to new-borns through Prevention of Parent to Child Transmission (PPTCT) and provide treatment and care to all children infected by HIV.

M&E and Research : India's response to HIV epidemic is influenced by the available surveillance data, implementation capacities and political commitment at state and national level. Apart from the sentinel surveillance, nationwide Computerised Management Information System (CMIS) provides strategic information on programme monitoring and evaluation.

Monitoring: However, in the planning of NACP-III it was felt that data from sentinel surveillance and CMIS are not sensitive enough to detect the emerging hot spots of the epidemic. To overcome this, NACO, in its third HIV/AIDS programme introduced Strategic Information Management System (SIMS) at national and state levels to focus on strategic planning, monitoring, evaluation, surveillance and research. It is aimed to provide effective tracking and response to HIV epidemic. The system assigns clear responsibilities to all programme officers and facilitates data flow and feedback at various levels.

Evaluation: Although a number of new initiatives were taken in the previous programme, their evaluation was not given adequate attention. This hindered the assessment of their efficacy. In NACP-III tools are proposed to be developed in consultation with the technical partners for the evaluation of each of the proposed intervention.

Research: Beginning NACP-III, NACO has positioned itself as the promoter and co-ordinator of research on HIV/AIDS not only in India, but the entire South Asia region through partnership and networking with national academic and other institutions in the region. This initiative will enhance NACO's knowledge and evidence base of the various aspects of the epidemic.

Surveillance: HIV Sentinel Surveillance (HSS) in India, since its inception in 1998, has evolved into a credible and robust system for HIV epidemic monitoring and acclaimed as one of the best in the world. Sentinel surveillance provides essential information to understand the trends and dynamics of HIV epidemic among different risk groups in the country. It aids in refinement of strategies and prioritization of focus for prevention, care and treatment interventions under the National AIDS Control Programme (NACP). HIV estimates of prevalence, incidence and mortality developed based on findings from HIV Sentinel Surveillance enable the programme in assessing the impacts at a macro level.

During NACP-IV, HIV Sentinel Surveillance will be conducted once in two years so that adequate time is spent on in-depth analysis and modeling, epidemiological research and use of surveillance data for programmatic purposes. The 13th round of sentinel surveillance will be conducted during 2012-2013.

4) Partners in TI implementation

A total of125 Targeted Intervention Projects of 81 NGOs from 29 districts are involved in ground level implementation

Out of 125 TI Proejcts- 41 TI Projects from 31 NGO's from 23 distrcts are working for FSW Polulation.

A total of 28 TI projecs from 22 NGOs from 16 distrcts are working for Core Composite

A total of 7 TI projecs from 7 NGOs from 7 distrcts are working for MSM Population.

A total of 39 TI projecs from 38 NGOs from 17 distrcts are working with Migrant Population.

A total of 9 TI projecs from 9 NGOs from 9 distrcts are working for Truckers population.

The details of 125 NGOs

About STRC/Work Accomplishments

State Training and Resource Centre (STRC)

Sosva Training and Promotion Institute (STAPI), Pune was selected and accorded a status of "State Training and Resource Centre (STRC) "by National AIDS Control Organization (NACO), New Delhi during July 2014. The various responsibilities of STRC includes :

Scope of Services, Tasks (Components) and Expected Deliverables of STRC

i) The STRC is responsible for training the various categories of staff working in Targeted Intervention projects and Link workers scheme:-

· Project Director of the NGOs - sensitization to HIV and need for quality training

· Program Managers, District Resource Persons, Block Supervisors

  • Accountants
  • Service providers such as Counselors/ANMs, Nurses
  • Outreach Workers and Peer Educators
  • Monitoring and Evaluation personnel

· Facilitate the trainings for Doctors and other Program staff as per the requirement.

  • Any others as indicated by NACO

ii) STRC will identify agencies/ resource persons at State / District level to train all the field staff based on the prescribed modules, tools and aids. Efforts should be to organize such training on site level so as to give hands on training.

iii) STRC to ensure 40% of total faculty time on training, 20% on field visits, 20% on research and 20% on reporting and documentation. The field visits are a must to understand the skills developments of the various categories of staff trained by STRC. The field visit need to ensure assessment that the skills are improved and also find out the gaps in the skills that are required to implement the TI programme as desired under NACP-III.

iv) TheSTRC'sare not to evaluate /monitor the TI programme neither they are supposed to discuss any matter related to the administration / policies/ financial matters with the TI.

v) NACO will provide prototype of teaching- learning materials/aids.Consultant to adapt them to local need, if required, translates into local language and ensures distribution to the trainees. STRC shall adapt the structure of training course/module as per local need.

vi) Develop case studies; design teaching aids; organize field visits; develop evaluation and assessment tools; grade the trainees in orders to identify those needing further training and attention; repeat training and undertake any other activity required to make the training knowledge as well as skill based.

vii) STRC will identify, hand hold and manage sites which can be used for demonstration purposes and learning sites, so that these demonstration sites can be used for cross learning purposes by the State.

viii) STRC will do field performance assessment of project functionaries (quarterly) vis-a-vis knowledge transferred once in six months and accordingly strengthen the modules and methodology.

ix) Provide to the client (NACO / SACS) within a week of completion of the training course, a detailed report as prescribed at Annexure-1 specifically grading participants to help identifying these needing repeat training or additional help.

x) The faculty of State Training Resource Centre will be responsible to deliver the training load.

Objectives of STRC-NACO Project:

· Building capacities of TI project functionaries to ensure qualitative improvement

  • Prevention of new HIV infections among HRGs and bridge populations

· Ensuring need-based quality training of TI-s as per NACP-III's technical and operational guidelines

· Developing local resources such as facilitators for trainings and demonstration sites, to ensure that the skill development process is sustained

· Enhancing the capacity of NGOs and civil society organizations in proposal development for NACP funded targeted intervention projects

  • Undertaking operational research and learning site development

Role of NACO and SACS is mainly to provide technical and administrative support to the STRC in implementation of the capacity building activities. The role of NACO and of MSACS is further illustrated below

Role of NACO

  • Provide Operational Guidelines and training materials.
  • Release of funds after receiving necessary financial documents.
  • Accord formal approval of faculty selected.
  • Monitoring the performance of the STRC on a regular basis.

Role of SACS

· Facilitate field visits to demonstration sites

· Attend the Academic Committee meeting to ensure training work plan is aligned with the Annual Action Plan of SACS

· SACS/TSU members will not act resource persons for training except in specific situations

· Release budget for trainings as per the earmarked amount in Annual Action Plan .

NACO- STAPI- STRC - MahrashtraProject Team :-

Sr. No

Team Details

Designation

1

Ms ParinitaKanitkar

Project Director STRC and Chief Executive STAPI

2

Mr NileshShinde

Training Co-Ordinator NACO STRC Project--STAPI Maharashtra

3

Mr Amar Chavan -

Training Officer NACO - STRC Project -STAPI Maharashtra

4

Mr. SreeleshNambiar

Training Officer NACO - STRC Project -STAPI Maharashtra

5

DeepaliChavan

Training Officer NACO - STRC Project -STAPI Maharashtra

6

Mr. VinodBhalerao

NACO - STRC Project -STAPI Maharashtra

7

Mr. AanandPatil

Project Accountant NACO - STRC Project -STAPI Maharashtra

STAPI-STRC Trainings

STAPI - STRC Training plan for year 2014-2015:

STAPI has been entrusted the capacity buildingof 1381 project staff viz project Manager, Counsellor, Outreach Workers, Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant cum Accountants of 125, TI Projects of 98 NGOs from 29 distrcits supported by MSACS.

These training batches will also include 25 District Resource Person- 100 Supervisors of Link Worker Projects supported by MSACS in residential batches of 4 days duration.

Additionally, STAPI will support MSACS in facilitation of 97 non-residential trainings of two days duration for Peer Educators and peer Leaders (50PEs onsite trainings , 22 PL-IPC district wise trainings) and 25 Link worker's onsite trainings) from Maharashtra. The trainings of the Project Doctors will be organised by MSACS.

The training plan was developed on the basis of series of discussions held with MSACS and TL -TSU on 12/8/2014 and on 29/9/2014 at MSACS and on 11/11/2014 at Pune.

STAPI Team conducted the Training Needs Assessment (TNA) of 09TI Projects from 4 districts of Maharashtra during October 2014.

The project team consisting of Project Director, Training Co-Ordinator and three Training Officers were imducted and oriented during the orientation training organized by NACO during 7-10 October 2014. The Assistant Directo TI ,MSACS was also a part of discussions held on 10/10/2014.

The Annual Training Plan for year 2014-2015 was finalised in consultation with MSACS. The Training Plan was developed keeping in mind various typologies and cadresto ensure addressal of training needs, challenges and issues for each typologies and cadres during the training programmes. The final training Calendar was shared with NACO.

A total of 11 residential batches of 3- 4 days duration were organized in the month of November 2014.(6 batches of 4 days duration; 4batches of 3 days duration and one ToT batch of 2 days duration).

A total of 9 residential batches of 3- 4 days duration were organized in the month of December 2014. (7 batches of 4 days duration; One batch of 3 days duration and one ToT batch of 2 days duration).

A total of 9 residential batches of 3- 4 days duration were organized in the month of December 2014. (7 batches of 4 days duration; One batch of 3 days duration and one ToT batch of 2 days duration).

A total of 8 residential training batches of 3-4 days duration are planned in the month of January 2015.

Training Plan for 2014-2015 and 2015- 2016

A Tabular Statement on Trainings counducted during November 2014- January

Sr.

Month

Category of staffs

Typologies

Total Training conducted

Total Trained in the reporting month

1

November 2014

1) Project Managers

2) Counselors

FSW/CC/Migrant/Trucker

11

Total Trained = 204 participants which includes 110 Project Managers, 77 Counselors and 17 Project Managers in Training of Trainers (ToT) on Peer Educator Training

2

December 2014

1) Counselors

2) Outreach Workers

3) Project Managers

FSW/MSM/CC/Migrant

09

Total Trained = 231 participants which includes 182- ORWs in the Induction Training for ORWs, 22 Counselors in Induction Training for Counselors and total 27 participants (22-Counselors and 05 Project Managers) in Training of Trainers (ToT) on Peer Educator Training

3

January 2015

1) Counselors

2) Outreach Workers

3) Project Managers

4) M&E cum Accountant

FSW/MSM/CC/Migrant/Trucker

08

Total Trained = 179 participants which includes 83 - ORWs in the Induction Training for ORWs, 13Left over Counselors in Induction Training for Counselors, 09 Left over PMs in Induction Training for Project Managers and total 74 participants (41- M& E cum Accountant and 33 Project Managers) in Induction Training for M&E cum Accountants from Truckers and Migrant TIs

Trainings of Peer Educators:

Background:

Under NACP IV , the TI approach encourage Peer-led interventions by community based organizations (CBO) or NGO's both in the rural and urban areas. All TI's are designed to work towards empowering the communities by following a Rights-based approach that recognizes the fundamental rights of every individual to information and services that seek to reduce His/her vulnerability to HIV/AIDS and provide the necessary, care treatment and support. The prevention strategies are thus linked to care and treatment, and seek to empower the community against stigma and discrimination.

In order to achieve a high level of coverage and to maintain quality of programme implementation, there is need for quality learning opportunities to be made available to NGO's/CBO's working at the grassroots level.

The Objective of the Peer Educator training is to benefit Peer Educators of the TI projects. They are the backbone of the project and it is there commitment and initiative that will go a long way in determining the successful outcome of the project. The important objectives of Peer Educator Trainings are as follows:

1) To orient the PEs about concept, component and services of TI project.

2) To build the Capacities of the Peer Educators with regards to their knowledge, attitude and skills.

3) To make PE aware about the roles and responsibility of Peer Educators.

Under the NACO STRC Project, the responsibility of conduct of Peer Educators training was with MSACS. STAPI as a STRC was to facilitate and co-ordinae with MSACS in smooth counduct of these trainings.

Planning for conduct of Training Plan for PE Trainings at district level

1)

We proposed typology wise PE trainings in Pune and adjacent Pune districts. The Trainings have been planned typology wise to have homogenous group for the training batches. STAPI-STRC had thus proposed conduct of PE Training first in Pune, Kolhapur, Aurangabad, Nasik and Ahmednagar districts followed by neighbouring districts.

Training load of Peer Educators

A total of 1981 Peer Educators from 125 TI NGO's from 29 districts are to be trained under NACO-STRC Project. As per NACO gudielines, all the PE training will be conduct at the district level (Onsite).

Out of the total 125 TI/NGO supported by MSACS, a total 676 Peer Educators from 41 TI FSW Projects, 447 Peer Educators from 28 Core Composite TI Projects, 666 Peer Educators from 39 TI Migrant Projects, 73 Peer Educators from 7 MSM TI Projects and 120 Peer Educators from 9 Truckers TI Projects will be trained by STAPI-STRC, Maharashtra.

Trainers/Facilitators for the Onsite Peer Educator training

The 44 Master Trainers, who have been trained in 2 Training of Trainers (TOT) by STAPI-STRC, Maharashtra will be facilitating the session during the PE Trainings. In addition to these master trainers, the experienced PE's (preferably with training experience) will also be involved in conduct of PE trainings.

The proposed PE Training Plan has been developed and shared with MSACS.

The 1stOnsiteTraining Plan of Peer Educators /Peer Leaders -

The 2ndOn siteTraining Plan of Peer Educators /Peer Leaders -

As per the discussions during the second Academic Commitee, it was decided that the content of PE trainings needs revision and the same should be discuss and taken up for consideration. It was also suggested by the Academic Commitee to form a committee who will review the existing PE training contents and will suggest the revision in the PE training contents.

The content of the PE module will be based on the need and location of the community.

The Committee will consist of representatives from Community members, Representatives from TI Project, MSACS, TSU, Members from Academic Committee and training experts The Committee was subsequently approved by the MSACS.

Academic Committee


Another important activity / scope of work of STRC includes constitution and formation of a Academic Committee consisting of 10-12 persons consisting of Academicians (who have wide experience of training in professional institutions), trainers (experts who are fully conversant with the methodology of teaching and pedagogy and can add value to the trainings conducted by STRC), representatives from established NGOs imparting training at grass root level (in any sector), social workers, representatives of the community from HRGs, TI partners and one representative of SACS.

The role of Academic Committee:

· To Identify, in order of priority, the categories of personnel to be trained during the year.

· To Review the content, methodology and duration of the training

· To Identify best practice sites for field visits and resource persons as required

· To Approve the Annual Work Plan with budget.

· To Review the implementation of the work plan every quarter and work done by the Project

Faculty

· The Committee should meet at least three times in a year

· During 1st month of contract period for development and approval of the annual work plan

to be incorporated in the AAP of the SACS

· To review the work by STRCs during 2nd month of 2nd quarter conducted as per the approved

annual work plan and undertake mid-term corrective action, if any.

Details of the Acadmic Committee Members -

Important Recommendations of Academic Committee-

Dr. Raman Gangakhedkar, Director, National AIDS Research Institute, Pune agreed to provide technical support in counduct of operational research and also support in revising the PE training module.

Dr. Ujjwal Nene recommended that finalisation of content and curriculam of the training well before the training will help in effective administration of the trainings.

Ms. Seema Anil Kumar recommended to develop a resource directory containing the various local terminologies, for effective training programme.

Ms. Rashmi Shirhatti recommended to document new Innovative ideas and methodologies applied throughout the training.

Learning Site Development


Learning Sites (LS) are knowledge centers which have demonstrated high level of success in the keyperformance indicators like contact, IEC, peer education, service uptake, community mobilizationand empowerment, risk reduction etc. The process involves and requires for identifying NGO/TIs; designing of a check list in consultation with MSACS.

A draft of the checklist of Learning

Development of Resource Centre


With the technical support of AVERT Society, STAPI as an Regional Training Institute have set up an "Resource Centre "in September 2012 with an aim of dissemination of knowledge and information to strengthen the learning through formal training at RTI level. The Resource Centre has immensely benefitted to NGO Partners working in the area of prevention of HIV/AIDS.

Functions of the Resource Centre:-

Information Generation , such as latest data and statistics, human stories, operational research studies, reports, papers; action research programmes; fact-finding and case documentation; process documentation of best practices.

Information Collection , such as literature reviews; internet based information.

Information Collation , such as maintaining a document library (books, pamphlets, reports, documents, folders etc); archiving news-clippings (print media incl. Journals and magazines); as well as audio-visual collections (films, flip charts, posters).

Information Dissemination , such as pro-active outreach specifically planned for the certain audience; putting up and distribution of the materials for wide dissemination; copying of information/materials and books upon request)

Operational research

Process for conduct of Operational Research. The following activities have been undertaken so far.

First meeting was organized on 26 February 2015 at STAPI, Pune.

It was decided that National AIDS Reasearch Institute will provide technical support in conduct of Operational Research.

a) The following topics were discussed with the NARI Team

Sr. No.

Proposed Topics for Operational Research

Proposed TI project

1

A study on Health status of HIV Positive FSW's linked with ART Centers in Pune District in 2013-14

FSW

2

A study on Health status of HIV Positive Migrants tested at ICTC from Pune district in the year 2013-14

Migrant

3

A study of the best practices implemented by ORW of Core Composite TIs.

CC

4

A study on Effective Functioning of PL HIV Network in Pune District

CC, Bridge

5

A study on Contribution of Migrants in the Blooming Industrial Growth in Pune District

Migrant

6

A study of accessibility of Government schemes by PLHIV

CC

7

A Study of Addiction among FSW and their Impact on their Heath in Pune district

FSW

8

A study on Temporary / Seasonal Migration in Pune District

Migrant

9

A study of DIC in Effective Implementation of TI Migrants projects in Pune District

Migrant

10

A study of needs of unorganized Migrants in Pune District

Migrant

11

Existing Prostitution : A study in Pune District

FSW

b) The STAPI and NARI team also reviewed the TNA reports of various TI NGOS of different typologies. It was discussed that out of 125 TI's in Maharashtra excluding Thane district, there are 43 FSW, 27 Core composite, 06 MSM, 39 Migrant, 09 Truckers and 01 IDU TIs. Therefore it was decided that FSW and Migrant TIs which are large in numbers can be given preference for Operational Research.

c) It was decided to visit few TI NGOs to understand ground level realities / challenges / learning's

The Second meeting was organized on 26 April 2015 at Natinal AIDS Research Institite (NARI), Pune.

i) The above listed topics were discussed with the NARI Team

ii) The STAPI and NARI team also reviewed the TNA reports of various TI NGOS of different typologies. It was discussed that out of 125 TI's in Maharashtra excluding Thane district, there are 43 FSW, 27 Core composite, 06 MSM, 39 Migrant, 09 Truckers and 01 IDU TIs. Therefore it was decided that FSW and Migrant TIs which are large in numbers can be given preference for Operational Research.

iii) It was decided to visit few TI NGOs to understand ground level realities / challenges / learning's

During the 2nd Academic Committee Meeting, held at MSACS, Mumbai on 10/3/2015, the above listed topics of operational reaseach were taken up for further discussion.

It was suggested during the second academic committee meeting that the topics for Operational Research should more focus on training needs and gaps identified amongst the TI staff during the training.

The suggested topics like Staff Turnover, Relationship between Project Manager & Project Director, Relationship between Project Manager and all Out-reach staff, Documentation of Best Practices may be considered for operational research to name a few.

It was also decided during the second academic committee that the purpose of Operational Research should be focus on quality improvement in implementation of TI project and in the interest of the community that the TI serves.

Based on the discussions of 26/2/2015 and 10/3/2015, the following six topics were finally shortlisted for operational research during the meeting held at NARI on 20/4/2015.

a) Comparative Study between trained & untrained staff.

b) Gaps and barriers in implementing training knowledge at field level

c) Usefulness of TNA for Induction training

d To explore effectiveness of different approach for need assignment

e To assess training of Training of Trainers and TI staff training

iv) What is staff turnover during project years and reasons.

Update on Action taken by STAPI-STRC with regards to Operational Research :-

· A meeting with Dr. Raman Gangakhedkar, Director, NARI, Pune was held on 2/2/2105 at NARI, Pune to discuss and seek guidance regarding the Operational Research. It was discussed that NARI, Pune will provide support and guidance to STAPI-STRC in conducting the Operational Research.

· A meeting was conducted on 26 /2/ 2015 at STAPI, Pune Office with the NARI team specialized in Research Activities. The objective of the meeting was to discuss the process of Operational Research under NACO-STRC Project.

· It was discussed duringthat meeting that NARI will extend technical support in finalization of the Topics for Operational Research, itsConceptualization, Developing data collection Tools, Data Analysis and Reporting and Documentation

· The proposed list of the topics for Operational Research was shared by STAPI - STRC team with the NARI members on 28/2/2015..

· STAPI-STRC is finalizing the revised topics for Operational Research as per NACO-STRC Operational guidelines.

· A meeting was conducted on 20/4/2015 for discussion of the following proposed topics for Operational Research at NARI

Topics for Operational Research :-

1. A study on need and importance of exposure visit during induction Training programmes for TI staff and its implications in understanding the TI projects.

1. Need and Importance of understanding various Government schemes to TI staff and its usefulness in TI project implementation

2. A study to understand the clarity of roles and responsibilities of TI staff versus challenges in actual implementation at the TI level.

3. To study the challenges in imparting knowledge and skills to the Key population (FSW/MSM/Migrant/Truckers) by Peer Educators/Peer Leaders.

4. To study the challenges in reducing the myths and misconception prevalent in FSW/MSM community.

5. To study the challenges and issues in developing appropriate negotiation and communication skills amongst TI staff for effective project implementation.

6. A study to identify important issues and challenges faced by ORWs in conducting Behaviour Change Communications with migrant population under Migrant TI

7. To study the factors affecting the reporting and Documentation skills of TI staff.

8. To study the common practices and misconceptions about condom usage prevalent within the Key population versus knowledge dissemination efforts taken by TI staff

9. To study the challenges in identification and reaching out to high risk migrant population

10. To study the challenges of TI project in Condom Social Marketing

11. To understand the challenges faced by TI counsellors in providing effective services to the clientele

12. To study the challenges faced by ORWs in providing holistic services to HIV positive Key population registered under the TI project.

We have identified two operational research topics in consultationwith National AIDS Research Institute, Pune and MSACS, Mumbai approved the same on dated 8/10/2015. Topics of Operational Research are as below:

1. What are the gaps and barriers in implementing training knowledge and skill at field level?

2. What are the various reasons for staff turnover and its consequential implications on overall TI implementation?

Resource Pool

Development of local Resource Pool.

STAPI-STRC has developed a pool of Resource Persons under NACO STRC project. STAPI -STRC is thankful the officials of MSACS, TSU and Members of the Academic Committee for their contacts and reference

Total 37 Resource Persons have been identified by STAPI-STRC to deliver training to TI staff as per their typology and in regard to their thematic areas. The Resource Pool have been developed keeping in mind the need and subject/theme of training content.

The Resoruce ppol consists of Doctors, Academician, Communication Specialist, Resource person with research experience, the community experts .

Best Practices

Training was conducted successfully beyond to considering any race, community people, discrimination and caste.

Training Report of 28 Training batches and TNA analysis reports and success stories shared by participants and it was documented by typology/cadrewise.

About Training Needs Assessment


Training Needs Assessment is the process of gathering and analyzing information about the

Current status and unmet service needs of a defined population or geographic area. In the context

of the STRCs, needs assessment involves collecting information about the needs of individuals

implementing strategic HIV & AIDS prevention programs and understanding role specific

knowledge, attitudes and skills of persons designated to perform a designated task. These training

needs will aide in developing job or role specific capacity building plans.

Training needs assessment is a critical step to identify gaps in the existing training programs, gap in the knowledge and skill level of all TI staff and recommending appropriate course content which could be utilized in designing and developing curriculum for the identified areas.

Training needs assessment is a critical step to identify gaps in the existing training programs, gap in the knowledge and skill level of all TI staff and recommending appropriate course content which could be utilized in designing and developing curriculum for the identified areas.

STAPI - STRC is instrumental in building the capacity of the Targeted Intervention Project staff . The primary objective of STRC is to build capacities of TI project functionaries to ensure qualitative improvement in their functioning to achieve the objective of prevention of new HIV infections among HRGs and bridge population.

To ensure that trainings provided to the TI staff are tailor made and suit well to the requirement of the program, Training needs assessment has been carried out across Maharashtra.

The Needs Assessment was carried out in 09 Targetted interventiI projects supported by

Maharashtra State AIDS Control Society (MSACS) covering 4 districts of Maharashtra. The detailed design of TNA ensured both quantitative and qualitative data collection from five typologies (FSW,MSM, Core Composite, Migrant and Truckers) and four different cadres of the staff.

The major areas of future trainings are interpersonal communication and behavior change communication, documentation skills, Roles and Responsibilities of each cadre, information on Government Schemes

Majority of Staff found more comfortable in communication in Marathi or Hindi. All the cadre of staff felt that a combination of all training methodologies (Lecture, Discussion, Game, Video show etc.) will encourages participation in the training programs.

The training batches were planned typology wise and cadre wise to address challenges and issues identified during TNA.

The TI project Staff, Peer educators of the different Targetted Intervention Projects ;Team Leader- TSU MSACS and Project Officers, extended the guidance and support in counduct of TNA .

The attachment of TNA report

Annual Report


Annual Report for the year 2014-2015 provide Link

About Monthly and Quarterly Programmetice Reports


The Montly and Quarterly Repots for the year of 2014-2015 and 2015-2016

Social Media

Face book, Twitter, etc.

Achievements/innovations by TI partner


TI Partner NGOs are suggested to share their achievements /innovations by TI Partner NGOs.

Feedback from Participants

1) Project Manager, John Poul Slum Development Project, FSW Project (Batch No. 1) Pune during 3-6 November 2015 mentioned that the training was really helpful in shaping up the knowledge, skills, attitude of the TI staff' and also coverage of Targeted Population -

2) Counselor of shri Kulswamini Shikshan PrasarakMandal District Osmanabad

Core Composite Project -27 - 29 November 2014 -Induction Training of Counselor (Batch No. 1) the training of Counselors was useful in sharperning the counselling technique and knowledge and it will definitely reflect on improvement in performance indicators

3) Out Reach Worker of (Batch No. 2 ) Rashtrasant TukdojiMaharajShikshanVaArogyaPrasarakMandal, District Amravati -FSW Project -

8 - 11 December 2014 mentioned that the training has given her conceptual clarity in planning and implementation of TI project activities and there is an improvement in skills, qualities & attitude.

4) Counselor of , SangliZilla Transport Association, District Sangali - Migrant TI Project Sangli -

Videos:-

1) HIV attacks human's immune system

2) VIDEO TENTANG HIV 1 (MALAYSIA)

3) Two Rohit

4) Case study

13. Contact us



You may contact us by visiting us at following postal address or even write us at given email address.

Chief Executive
SosvaTraining & Promotion Institute (STAPI)
MHADA Commercial Complex, First Floor,
Maharashtra Housing Board Colony,
Yerwada, Pune 411 006

Maharashtra, India

Tel: +91-20- 2668 7900 / 2669 6212 / 2668 2714/26684641

Fax No. 020-2669 5646E-mail:stapipune@gmail.com, nita@stapi.org.in